Home / Health & Beauty / A new study is the first to discover links between chemicals that are widely used in cosmetic and personal care products in healthy, reproductive-age women and changes in their reproductive hormones. : Health

A new study is the first to discover links between chemicals that are widely used in cosmetic and personal care products in healthy, reproductive-age women and changes in their reproductive hormones. : Health

The title of the post is a copy and paste from the second and fourth paragraphs of the linked academic press release here :

A new study published in Environment International by CHHS Assistant Professor of Global and Community Health Dr. Anna Pollack and colleagues discovered links between chemicals that are widely used in cosmetic and personal care products and changes in reproductive hormones.

“This study is the first to examine mixtures of chemicals that are widely used in personal care products in relation to hormones in healthy, reproductive-age women, using multiple measures of exposure across the menstrual cycle, which improved upon research that relied on one or two measures of chemicals,” Pollack noted.

Journal Reference:

Anna Z. Pollack, Sunni L. Mumford, Jenna R. Krall, Andrea E. Carmichael, Lindsey A. Sjaarda, Neil J. Perkins, Kurunthachalam Kannan, Enrique F. Schisterman.

Exposure to bisphenol A, chlorophenols, benzophenones, and parabens in relation to reproductive hormones in healthy women: A chemical mixture approach.

Environment International, 2018; 120: 137

DOI: 10.1016/j.envint.2018.07.028

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412018307128?via%3Dihub

Highlights

• Bisphenol A, chlorophenols, UV filters, parabens linked with reproductive hormones.

• Parabens factors associated with increased estradiol.

• Phenol and UV filter factors associated with decreased estradiol, FSH, and LH.

• In single chemical models, paraben metabolites associated with hormones.

Abstract

Background

Little is known about the associations of bisphenol A, chlorophenols, benzophenones, and parabens with reproductive hormone levels in women. Our goal was to evaluate the associations between repeated measures of these chemicals and their mixtures with reproductive hormones in women.

Methods

Longitudinal urine samples from healthy, premenopausal women (n = 143 with 3–5 urine samples each) were measured for bisphenol A, five chlorophenols (2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,5-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, triclosan), two ultraviolet (UV) filters (benzophenone-1, benzophenone-3), and eight parabens and their metabolites (benzyl, butyl, ethyl, heptyl, methyl, propyl, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HB), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB)) over two menstrual cycles. Estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured in blood up to 8 times each menstrual cycle. Linear mixed models were used for both single and multi-chemical exposures estimated using principal component analysis. Four factors were identified including: paraben; paraben metabolites and BPA, phenols, and UV filters. Models were adjusted for creatinine, age, race, and body mass index and weighted with inverse probability of exposure weights to account for time varying confounding.

Results

In single-chemical models, 3,4-DHB was associated with estradiol (0.06 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.001, 0.12)), 2-4-DCP with increased progesterone 0.14 (0.06, 0.21) and decreased FSH −0.08 (−0.11, −0.04), and 4-HB was associated with increased FSH 0.07 (0.01, 0.13). In multi-chemical models, all factors were associated with increased progesterone (beta coefficient range: 0.15 for UV filter factor to 0.32 for paraben factor). The paraben factor and the paraben metabolite and BPA factor were associated with increased estradiol [0.21 (0.15, 0.28); 0.12 (0.07, 0.18)]. The phenol and UV filter factors were associated with decreased estradiol, FSH, and LH. The UV filter factor showed the strongest inverse association with estradiol −0.16 (−0.22, −0.10), FSH −0.12 (−0.17, −0.07), and LH −0.17 (−0.23, −0.10).

Conclusion

Mixtures of phenols were associated with changes in reproductive hormones. Such changes could contribute to adverse health in women but additional research is necessary.


Source link

About zoval

Check Also

Cleveland Clinic-Oscar Health pairing is exceeding hopes

Oscar Health and Cleveland Clinic are looking to capitalize on the initial success of their …